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What does the Kingdom of God look like (in real life)? Part 2: It is Eternal

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my grandmother, my mother, me (little guy on right), and my siblings.

 

Part 2 of 7 in an ongoing series to attempt to answer the question “What does the Kingdom of God look like (in real life)?”:     

#2. (of 7) It is Eternal

The Kingdom of God is eternal.  And that eternity has already begun.  Because God’s Kingdom is eternal, and so conceivably also outside of our conception of time, it can be simultaneously now and not yet.  we know the Kingdom of God is not FULLY here yet (just the news from the past weekend would demonstrate that) but we also know that it is breaking through now in our midst.  

If we’re only focused on how it is not here yet fully then we may miss signs of how it actually is already being revealed here now.  

That’s some nice philosophizing Dave, but how do you know the Kingdom of God is actually eternal?  How do you know with certainty it will last, especially in the face of such evil we see these days?  

Well, I don’t know with 100% certainty (what do we actually?), but I think it’s reasonable for me to believe the Kingdom of God is eternal and cannot be destroyed…from my background and story as a Japanese-American living in the 21st century.  

If you know a little about the Japanese, you know they can be pretty intense, to put it mildly.

Over 400 years ago when organized Christianity first arrived on the shores of Japan, it was received with some curiosity.  But that didn’t last for long.  Under the Shogunate system (military dictatorship) of Japan, some of the most brutal repression and persecution of christians ever recorded in history took place.  One of the most feared forms of punishment for not renouncing faith in Jesus was to be crucified upside down into a pit of sewage and be cut behind the ears so that one would die slowly. The persecution was so intense that in about 30 years it ceased to exist publicly.  

Yet the Kingdom of God persisted in the form of hidden Christians (“kakure” Christians). the Shogunate government however did not.  It was replaced by a government with an emperor in the Meiji era which was then replaced by the Taisho era with a new emperor. As the country opened up from its isolationist policies, a new wave of Christian missionaries re-entered Japan.  

Japan, under the guise of the emperor, began to imitate the colonizing west and started amassing power beyond a national scale.  One country they occupied in the early 20th century was Korea, systematically attempting to wipe out their language, their culture, and their dignity by even forcing their women to become “comfort women” (aka sex slaves) for the Japanese troops.  Some Japanese Christians refused to submit to the radical nationalism that was sweeping Japan.  They were persecuted and imprisoned as a result.   

Yet, the Kingdom of God persisted in the form of a strong Korean church born out of oppression, which is now, arguably, one of the countries that sends the most missionaries abroad per capita.  The Kingdom of God persisted in the form of Japanese believers that became a “confessing church to resist nationalism like the Japanese Holiness Movement of Churches, which happens to be the church that my father, me, and my siblings came to faith in.  The Kingdom of God persisted over hate in the form of my marriage of reconciliation to an awesome Korean-American believer.  The Empire of Japan, however, did not last.  Since 1947 Japan has renounced the right to initiate any acts of war.  

On the other hand, in the U.S. after the bombing of Pearl Harbor by the empire of Japan an executive order was issued in 1942 by the acting American president that ordered the internment of anyone with Japanese ancestry living in the states, to live in camps of row houses in the deserted wastelands of the west.  The majority of these Japanese were American citizens, some even fighting for the U.S. that had interned their families.   There was no due process, no innocent till proven guilty.  In fact, no person of Japanese ancestry living in the U.S. was ever convicted of treason.  Homes, properties, businesses, churches, communities had to be abandoned with no rights of return.  Even after being fully segregated and released 4 years later with the end of the war, Japanese-American Christians had to suffer the indignity of not being allowed to have their churches back but told to go to white churches, these same churches that stood by and watched their own siblings in Christ be bused away.  

Yet the Kingdom of God persisted, as I grew up in a Japanese-American church.  I went to church alongside those who had been interned.  The Kingdom of God persisted in these Japanese-Americans who had been unjustly imprisoned.  They did not lose faith.  They loved me and taught me to keep on loving Jesus and to forgive those who had wronged them. They set me on a path to a better way.  The internment camps did not last.  The American government eventually apologized and made some reparation.  I pray such injustices never again happen in the United States to ANYONE and am so proud of my Japanese-American people who continue to fight for the rights of the immigrants on the margins.        

After the war, in Japan, my grandmother was invited to an event by a local neighbor.  My grandmother became a Christian.  My grandfather was furious.  He found her bible and tore it up.  

Yet, the kingdom of God of persisted in my grandmother.  She did not lose her faith but passed it on to her daughter, my mother.   My mother, was struck by her mother’s unwavering convictions and faithfulness in the face of persecution by my grandfather.  So when my mother was invited to a Christian event in college, in the midst of protests in the 60’s, she accepted Christ.  She came to the U.S. and met my father in church.  They  passed on the secret of the Kingdom to me.  Who knows how much I am sustained to this very moment by the faithful prayers of my mother?  I hope to pass on the Kingdom of God to my two sons, who now represent the 4th generation of faith in my family, even in the midst of uncertain times and circumstances.   My grandfather’s persecution did not last.  

The Kingdom of God, however, has lasted.  It has stood the test of humanity’s savage empires, repressions, violence, crucifixions, occupations, colonizations, sexual assaults, attempted genocides, imprisonments, prejudices, internments, and persecutions…and it will continue to.     

The Kingdom of God is indestructible.  

If you are of the Kingdom of God, you will persist.  

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What Does the Kingdom of God Look Like (in Real Life)? Part 1: It’s a Treasure Worth ALL

in my last post i shared with you my findings of what the Kingdom of God looks like according to the bible.  i realize that that post title was misleading in that some, including myself, want to know what the Kingdom of God looks like…unfolding in the 21st century, in the here and now…in real life.  my friend A.R. reminded me that those stories would be helpful examples.  with that in mind, i hope to take the 7 aspects of the Kingdom of God i (re)discovered and “flesh them out” with what i have witnessed myself of the Kingdom of God breaking through in our midst.  halfway into drafting the first “story” it dawned on me that this task may be more than 1 post could handle so i plan to publish a total of 7 posts over the course of the next couple months for each principle and its corresponding true story from my experience that illustrates the principle.  

here goes the 1st: so what does the Kingdom of God look like…in real life?  

#1. (of 7) the Kingdom of God is a treasure worth giving up ALL else for

for me discovering the value of the treasure of the Kingdom was a process.  i received the King into my life around 7th grade.  the deeper understanding of the Kingdom and its worth, especially the giving up stuff, came after that.  there have been different things and relationships i’ve had to lay down in order to “seek first the Kingdom” and, i suspect, i will continue to this side of heaven.  

but the most significant thing that comes to mind that God led me to give up, in my journey thus far, was the security of my job.  i was 8 years into my career as a public high school teacher when my wife and i sensed God calling us to move into the inner city for the work of His Kingdom.  it was not a decision we came to easily, but it was confirmed by multiple convictions and events.  we had no idea what this ministry would really look like and what exactly God was calling me into but, one thing was clear, i would have to leave my job and the security my salary represented.  i had to take a step of faith into the unknown because Jesus, my King, was calling me to move out of what was familiar to me.  i put in my resignation at locke high school in the spring of 2011.  i joined an unpaid internship to learn about living amongst the poor that fall.  we found out that my wife was pregnant.  i was unemployed for months and could only find a job as a substitute teacher.  it was a humiliating step down for me who used to be a full time teacher.  

then in the beginning of 2012 i sensed God was calling me to be a pastor of outcasts full-time.  but to be a pastor in the neighborhood i now lived in meant that i would need to fundraise my salary (which at most would only be half of what i was paid as a teacher), not only because our church could barely pay the rent but because anything raised by our church we believe should go to a local leader that is raised up, not a “relocator” like me.  then my father-in-law saw my fundraising letter.   he was furious.  he could not believe what i was doing and what i was about to put his daughter and his grandchild through.  he yelled “are you a beggar?”, “you are a fool to think people would support you in this work!”  needless to say, the Kingdom of God did not feel like a treasure to me at that point.    

so, i prayed, “God, if this is the work you want me to do, please provide the $2000 of monthly support our family needs within the next 6 months.  please vindicate me.”

and He did.  and then some.  

you see, it was not just the money he provided to meet that initial goal  (which God provided within 6 months!) through generous supporters who believed in this work of expanding the Kingdom of God; he was giving me and my family so much more than we had imagined.  what we give up for the Kingdom, we get Kingdom treasure in return.  i had left my locke II community of teachers, one of the most amazing staffs I have EVER had the privilege to work with.  we had left our church community at wlah, who commissioned us with such grace, love, and support (they are still our biggest supporters).  we have now gained spiritual family i never would have gained, if we had clung to our familiar comfort.  spiritual family members that come from different backgrounds, social classes, and races than my family.  spiritual family that prays for us so faithfully and with so much more faith and desperation (with tears) than we have.  spiritual family that God speaks to with things for us that we never even told them.  

you see, we may have thought we were moving into a neighborhood to help those in need but God was moving us into the neighborhood for our growth, for our healing, for our wholeness.  we think we are making a sacrifice to serve others but God uses that process and those in need to turn around and bless us with what no money can buy.  it may not come in the timing or manner that we may expect but, in God’s Kingdom, the blessings go ALL around and are shared with ALL.  

you see, Jesus was telling the truth that what we give up for the Kingdom is not worth comparing to what we gain in the Kingdom.  it is something that rewards “many times more” in this life as well as the life to come…indeed with his Kingdom, we’re still witnessing the treasure unfold.   

nothing that we could ever own nor any intimate human relationship we could ever have surpasses the Kingdom of God in worth.